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I Will Not Pray For You, I Will Be Here For You. aka: No Parent Should Ever Have To Bury Their Child. 

I Will Not Pray For You, I Will Be Here For You. aka: No Parent Should Ever Have To Bury Their Child. 

(This post was inspired by the tragedy that occurred at Schlitterbahn in Kansas City Sunday, August, 7th. And dedicated to all my friends who have lost their child.)

A parent should never have to bury their child.

That is not the natural order or progression of life. It makes no sense. And such is life: nonsensical at times. 

I am overwhelmed and feel like I’ve been kicked in the gut when I read of a child dying in a senseless accident  (that is not placing blame for yesterday’s accident)  such as being forgotten or locked in a car that overheats. No matter the instance, no matter the accident, illness, or malicious intent of someone, a parent burying their own child is an absolute tragedy. 

I’m only one person and know of too many friends who have had to bury their own child. Think of what I just said: 

Bury. Their. Own. Child.

If you don’t have children I’m not discounting your ability to understand this scenario but the rush of love that fills your life when you have a child is astronomical. Words can’t explain the amount of love that coarses through your life. I didn’t (couldn’t) understand this before I had my two sons. 

But then, to have the focus of your love taken from you – feeling helpless and impotent and frozen. With NOTHING able to fill that void. 

Good god. 

Horrific. 

As friends we think of the parents the day the tragedy happens and maybe periodically afterwards (not a guilt trip, just reality) but the parents have to live with the heartache every single hour of every single day. 

To all my friends who have had this tragedy happen, I am so sorry. I love you. I can not fathom or empathize what it is like to be in your shoes – to experience a heart-wrenching loss. My heart breaks when I hear of your tragedies. But please know I am here for you. 

To everyone else, please keep your children safe. 

Walk alongside your friends who have experienced this tragedy. If you’re a flesh and blood friend don’t tritely offer to pray. If they are religious they might be questioning a whole helluva lot of faith’s worth and don’t want to hear a hollow offer. I know I wouldn’t. 

Here’s a song by the band Needtobreathe singing of the importance of friends and community and how we should be there for each other during times in our life that can rock our foundation, crush our spirits, tear our souls to shreds. 

At the same time, their faith could be their only shred of hope they have to cling on to as they feel the walls of the natural order crumbling around them. Everyone reacts different. 
They need continual, tangible help; a shoulder, an ear, or a body to just sit with them. Be there and be available for them as they need you. 

Lord be with us all. 

I am here for you. 

Thy kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. 

https://youtu.be/R3-wie9NOZE

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Posted by on August 8, 2016 in creation, culture, spiritual, theology

 

“I’m Sorry.”

It’s been a tough couple of weeks. As a nation we have had so many things to process and work through. Mark Driscoll gets booted (rightfully so) from Mars Hill and Acts 29. Robin Williams commits suicide. And finally, after a couple days of ignoring it, the media started paying attention to what was going on in Ferguson, MO after Michael Brown was killed by a white police officer. And then on top of that all hell broke loose on social media – twitter, Facebook, blogs, etc., about what was going on in Ferguson.

A very tough couple of weeks.

Throughout this past week’s racial tension that we all saw unfold in Ferguson, and then with the horrible fallout on social media, we were exposed to people and media outlets showing their true (racist) colors. On social media I saw “friends” post blatantly racist comments and also post veiled racist comments that were truly disheartening.

And disgusting.

Here in Little Rock, my wife, son, and I attend a multi-cultural church – Mosaic Church. Our church is made up of Caucasians, African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians, Eastern Europeans, and other ethnicities. It’s a beautiful thing to witness so many ethnicities worshipping our multi-racial god during what is the most segregated hour (11am-12pm) in America. Regrettably, racism is an issue that is unlikely to be solved in our ethnically segregated churches. If we don’t worship together how can we expect to work together on an issue that plagues our society?…and plagues the South moreso than anywhere else in our country.

When we went to church this past Sunday I was wondering what the atmosphere would be like. Would there be the elephant in the room (Ferguson) that we would not talk about? Would it be tense. Would it be normal? How could it be normal?

I don’t know why, but I arrived at church with an attitude of, “I’m sorry” towards my African-American brothers and sisters. I’m sorry for the way our nation has reacted to the situation in Ferguson, MO. I’m sorry for what happened in Ferguson. I’m sorry for the things that were/are being said in the media. I’m sorry for the hateful, vile things that were/are being said and spread on social media. I’m sorry that we (via the media) clamor to hear about the white couple who has gone missing, but turn a blind eye towards the minorities who die or are murdered every day in our cities’ core. I’m sorry.

But this past Sunday, I also saw hope. I saw understanding. I saw solidarity. I saw this issue addressed in the setting and clarifying manner it should be addressed – with multiple ethnicities being able to converse about the issue.

Every Sunday at Mosaic we close our worship service in prayer and each row of people holds hands with the people next to them stretching across the width of the worship area.

We do this every week and normally it doesn’t mean much more to me than a nice gesture, but this week it seemed like a strong gesture of solidarity after Mark DeYmaz addressed the white elephant in the room.

In the clip below watch what Mark DeYmaz had to say and the 5 questions he asked about the Ferguson situation. (click the play button)

I will have a longer, more in-depth post about racism in the near future – it’s been in the works for quite awhile.

 
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Posted by on August 18, 2014 in culture, spiritual, theology

 

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Explanation/Excommunication Part II – The Excommunication

The Excommunication 

Why is there a (very much delayed) second (and third) part to this post? Well, this is a follow-up to my first post and is what actually happened to me (and my wife), and in the next part I’ll examine “why” it happened. I will bring up some ideas/thoughts of why what happened in our community group actually happened. Make sense? In essence, I am going to look at the reason behind the reason.

What happened 

Earlier this year…well actually, earlier last year (2012), my wife and I were asked to leave our community group. Over 2 1/2 years ago my wife and I had joined this community group through the church we used to attend, and we had been part of this community group since the beginning of our marriage. The reason two of the guys were asking us to leave was that in their opinion, and in their words, I was bitter, and divisive with my opinions of their church, and also that I was posting negative thoughts (on social media) about their church that made them feel defensive. They told me I could remain in the community group if I stopped posting the things I had been posting, and that I had 48 hours to decide if I would comply with their demands…I mean their desires. 😉

Rush to Judgment

First of all, their accusations were completely off-base. Unless there is something completely egregious done by a specific church I don’t post about any one specific church. I post about the “church at large”. I did have one blog post about a year ago from a sermon I heard at our former church that really irked me, but in all other examples I posted in generalities about “the church at large”. I guess somehow they had a bit of narcissism built into the things I post where they thought everything I talked about was about their church. On their last complaint it almost brought me to the point of laughter, is that one of them went so far as to say that he felt uncomfortable with what I post because he believed people would associate what I would post as representing his thoughts and views. WTF?!?! Wow. That comment totally blew me away. That type of attitude is full-fledged narcissism. But now the whole “excommunication” has had time to blow over; in a way can still be a bit irksome (not sure if that is really a word) but in actuality it’s just simply comical and laughable. What happened in that community group is no way representative of true community. My wife and I now just laugh at the whole situation. While she doesn’t always condone what I post…and truth be told she sometimes cringes when I proudly proclaim, “I blogged!”, she overall respects and supports my beliefs and supports the avenues in which I express them. I love my wife!

Me and Wifey

Me and the Wifey

Now I will admit, none of this would have happened if I knew how to keep my fat, pie-hole shut about things that the church (at large) does that upsets me. (if you need a reminder of why I post what I post see my last post: The Explanation) But please understand what I am saying: the things that I posted & tweeted, that the guys were upset about, (which were not anything over the top or crazy!) are the the things where I feel the church has missed the mark on and missed the reason the church is in existence. In fact, I’m more discouraged with them as Christians in their beliefs and most of all their handling of the situation that they tried to squash what I had to say. And I honestly feel so strong about how much the church has bastardized its mission and how neglectful the church is being towards those who need assistance that I can’t keep my feelings to myself. Spending millions of dollars on audio/video equipment (which many churches do) while people in our streets go hungry is merely one example. When I post/talk about these issues I don’t bring them up in a spiteful manner; I speak from the heart for why it upsets me. I can handle less than perfect acoustics in a church if it means others can have food to eat, or healthcare for their illness. A while back my wife and I visited a church that was a beautiful church building with concrete floors, grandiose vaulted ceilings, and a sound system that by the looks of it might have cost $10,000. Were the acoustics the best? Not by any means, but I can honestly say I had a more worshipful experience that Sunday than at any other church here in Little Rock. (We also got a pretty good aerobic workout because it was an anglican church which meant we were doing a lot of up, down, kneel, up, down, kneel, up, down, kneel. I digress…)

Thou has committed a grave sin! “Say What?!”

The manner in which these two guys “confronted” me about their issues with me, and also in the weeks leading up to it (they never responded to emails and texts that I had sent to both of them with honest questions and concerns), and also the way they kept me in the dark with their feelings towards what I posted and never voiced any disapproval until they gave me their ultimatum of “stop posting or get out”, and the fact that they gave me such a ridiculous ultimatum, it was very clear to me and my wife that we would not remain in that community group. And I ended up letting them know our decision just right before their 48 hour deadline expired (I wanted to create a little soap-opera-esque drama 😉  The way they handled the entire situation honestly almost felt like I had committed some huge sin and they were enacting “church discipline” on me. In no way whatsoever was what went down in this situation a reflection of good, true, meaningful community. Again, it was just absolutely 100% absurd.

Why are we so quick to eliminate and/or paint people as miscreants when they hold a different point of view than what we hold? It seems like Christians have no tolerance whatsoever.

I Must Break You…But In Case I Can’t Please Just Go Away.

 

Of all religions, the Christian is without doubt 

the one which should inspire tolerance most, 

although up to now the Christians 

have been the most intolerant of all men.

– Voltaire

The longer you are removed, chronologically, 

from your conversion the more likely it is 

that you’re going to struggle with self-righteousness.

– Darrin Patrick

Spiritual security comes when we stop being anxious about others and begin to watch after ourselves. 

– Teresa of Avila

Faith afraid to think is unbelief masked in piety. 

Unbelief afraid to think is pseudo-faith 

with Enlightenment trimmings. 

– G. Ebeling tweeted by @trippfuller

Do the hard work of questioning your doubts, 

not just the easy work of raising them. 

– @Jonathan_Dodson

Let us test and examine our ways, and return to the Lord! 

– Lamentations 3:40

I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy,

as cause for withdrawing from a friend. – Thomas Jefferson 

“Humility is born when we acknowledge our biases and the limitations of our perspectives. … An important part of life is learning to see things from different perspectives rather than simply judging those who don’t agree. I am a person of faith. I believe we are supposed to cooperate with each other instead of comparing ourselves to one another. I believe that each person on this planet is unique and different – a Masterpiece. The hues of melanin add beauty and the myriad of philosophies and perspectives make me consider and evaluate what I most deeply believe. Faith is supposed to encourage me to courageously explore all of life, not to fear the unknown. Faith is supposed to teach me to trust that God is with me wherever I go, not to rely on sight alone. This means that there are times when the perspectives and schemas I’ve developed to process life must be completely torn down and rebuilt when new and challenging viewpoints are presented.” 

– Ethan D. Bryan, “Run Home & Take a Bow, Stories of Life, Faith And a Season With The Kansas City Royals”

Building off of Ethan’s great quote (from his book which I highly recommend!!)…as Yoda would say…

“You must unlearn what you have learned”, pretty wise teaching from Jedi master Yoda. We must be willing to not rush in so quickly to judge people, but instead see what we can learn from others…but I’ll delve more into that in part 3.

So after going through all of this ridiculousness over the past 6 months it got me thinking about how some Christians treat other people (and yes, even how some Christians treat other Christians), and how some people deal with others who who hold different views. It’s honestly a bit discouraging when you think about it.

Eliminate?

Acclimate?

Tolerate?

What is the right way to handle those who have different belief-systems? It seems simple when you think about, but what we believe we should do and what we actually do are sometimes two entirely different things. The ole “ought/is” debate. It’s always fun. 🙂

1) Why we treat some people the way we do, 2) a glimpse of what should’ve happened in my community group, and 3) what can be learned from the whole crazy situation, are topics I’ll dive into in part III. (I promise it won’t be as long of a time-frame to post part III. 😉

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on January 30, 2013 in community, culture, spiritual, theology

 

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The Explanation and The Excommunication

(part 1 of 2)

The Explanation

I wanted to wait awhile before I posted this series of posts because I was pretty ticked about something that happened recently (more on what actually happened later) and wanted to make sure I wasn’t writing this from a knee-jerk reaction of being ticked – however, this specific post was inspired by what actually happened. And after waiting, processing what happened, and reflecting back I think I’ve reached a good point of levity to spell things out honestly and objectively while intertwining my own take of what went on – as weird and off-base as it was…but most of that is in the second part of this post that I will post in a couple days.

This post is an explanation of why I write and post about what I write and post.

Some thing compels me, therefore I write. 

Provoking a reaction isn’t the same thing as saying something significant.

– Calvin, from Calvin and Hobbes

Let me dispel any myths, or incorrect assumptions, about why I write, tweet, and post, right off the bat: I’m not a bitch-and-moan type of person and I’m not bitter towards the church or towards Christians. I’m not. Bitter and negative people actually annoy me…alot. Plus, that type of an attitude or mindset gets you nowhere other than being cynical and focusing on the negative things in life. If you surf the internet or flip on the TV you will be flooded with all kinds of information about what’s wrong with this world. Bad things happen where we work and there are things that happen in our families that we can’t control, and I choose not to waste my time focusing on those things because that would just beat me down. I don’t ignore the negative things that happen – it needs to be fixed or corrected if possible, but I choose not to focus on it being bad and instead choose to see what is possible – how things could be better. Another way to look at is, if I was apathetic to an issue I wouldn’t be voicing any concern, because it wouldn’t matter to me – but I actually care about what I write about. You won’t see me writing about the WNBA or NASCAR or gardening tips because mainly I don’t care about those things. You won’t see me giving fashion tips, or hair-styling ideas (honestly, have you seen my hair?…or lack thereof). Again, because I don’t care about those things.

I just don’t care.

I mean, I care to some extent in the fact that NASCAR is a sport and I like sports, and in regards to fashion I don’t want to dress like a slob; but that’s the extent of those examples. They don’t interest me enough to delve into. So I write about things that truly matter to me.

I deeply care about Christianity. I care about how we as Christians have withdrawn from culture and taken an “individualism is king”/evacuation theology approach to our faith. Also, I think it’s rather important that we as the church examine how churches are appropriating our money (that is another post I’m writing that is coming in the near future and I’m pretty sure it’ll piss off some people; but if some people get pissed off I’m not that concerned about it considering there are people dying in the streets while churches spend umpteen millions of dollars on buildings, lights, and audio/video equipment – that wastefulness and ignoring of what Jesus told us to do really brings out Grumpy Derek; and Jesus was just kidding about that whole “Feed my sheep” idea, wasn’t he?). All that stuff matters to me so I write about it. But I’m not bitter. I don’t bitch and moan. I don’t say things to solely provoke a reaction and piss people off. I would like to think I provoke people to action. Or if nothing else, if that action is to solely think about what we as Christians are doing or what we could be doing then that’s a-ok with me. That’s a step.

“He who begins by loving Christianity more than Truth,will proceed by loving his sect or church better than Christianity, and end in loving himself better than all.” – Samuel Taylor Coleridge

I’m not a SAD person.

A couple weeks ago I went to North Central Arkansas for work and on my drive back home to Little Rock I was talking to a friend on the phone. I wasn’t paying attention to how fast I was going but to my chagrin the police officer coming from the other direction was paying attention to my speed. He turned around and pulled me over and thankfully this fine officer of the law only gave me a warning (and a racing heartbeat), when he definitely could’ve given me a healthy sized ticket (I might have possibly been going 67mph in a 55mph speed limit). But the funny part was before he handed me the warning he needed to write down my license plate information and his comment to me was, “Ha, that’s funny! I haven’t seen a license plate that spells “SAD”. I told him that I was very disappointed when I went to get my license plate and just by dumb-luck my license plate actually spelled “SAD”. I told him I was an optimist. He laughed. I laughed. I drove home with my eyes glued to my speedometer.

So…like I mentioned, some people have misunderstood things I’ve written or moreso the manner and reason behind why I write about topics on my blog, Facebook, and Twitter, in regards to the Church-at-large and because of that I’m writing this post to explain some things. Let me also remind you, you can ALWAYS ask me for clarification. Don’t just assume I mean something if you’re not exactly clear what I mean. Again, this is what happened recently and it honestly ticked me off (it brought out Grumpy Derek) because these people who I had been in a community group with for more than two years conferred with each other, not with me, and formed their own wrong conclusions about my intentions, made a decision, and gave me an ultimatum, instead of asking me what I actually meant. Going to the source for clarification..what a novel idea. Grab a beer and hang out with me and you’ll get to know me and what I’m like…but if you want to draw your own assumptions I can’t help that. Unfortunately, that’s what happened, and I thought these guys knew me. Nope. (I hope all this foreshadowing will compel you to read part 2 and continue to read my blog in the future. 😉

Seriously, I’m actually a pretty cheery kind of guy.

…ok, but not over the top like Jim Carrey in “The Truman Show”.

“Lucy, you’ve got some ‘splainin’ to do.”/The Explanation.

So…due to this recent confusion (read crazy-ass assumptions), I have felt the need to clarify topics that I write about, and more importantly the manner/attitude in which I write them. I write, post on facebook, and tweet about alot of different topics: theology, politics, books, culture, the Church, trends in Christianity, world-views, KU sports, cigars, beer, and more. But when I post, tweet, or write things about the Church 97% of the time (I have no idea of the actual percentage, but I would imagine 97% is pretty dog-gone close) I write about the “church-at-large” – Church with a capital “C”; not about individual, specific churches. The only time I will single out a specific church is if I know they’re doing something so egregiously bad it’s reprehensible…or if they are doing something amazingly good.

Let me share my background briefly. I moved to Little Rock in 2008 and from day one I have had a hell-ish church experience for many reasons I won’t go into right now; I have attended 4 churches in Little Rock and am currently church-less. Going back a bit further: since I graduated college in 1999 I have lived in 5 metropolitan areas and have seen the Church trends I talk about happen all over the country.  But the one thing I hold onto that gives me hope is I attended 2 churches (one in Kansas City, Beggars Table, and one in St. Louis, The Journey) who  have given me hope of what church here in Little Rock can look like and I guess I’m just crazy enough to believe I can help to be a part of the change that needs to happen. But again, I bring up my background in all of the cities to say that I’ve seen the trends that I write about happen all across the country. I’m not picking on any one church in Little Rock. Like I mentioned before, unless there is a specific issue happening at a specific church (egregiously good or egregiously bad) I try not to single out any one church by name – most of the time it’s not beneficial and just not necessary. If I did that it would be akin to when a cop sees a group of 10 cars speeding on the highway and pulls over just one person and only gives them a ticket while the other 9 cars continue speeding down the highway without getting in any trouble. Even though the person who got the ticket is guilty of speeding it sucks that they were singled out and given the ticket, while all the other speeders were not pulled over. Many churches in the area are all guilty of the same thing so why pick on one individually? Bring up the issue and take action to make things better. Don’t just bitch and moan about things that go wrong. Do something about it. My hope is to help start a new church in Little Rock similar to Beggars Table and the Journey and some good things are starting to happen.

Wrapping up

I write because I enjoy writing.

I write about things I care about.

I write out of deep conviction.

I write because it is cathartic.

I write because I believe things can be better than how they currently are.

I write because I believe some things we as Christians currently do/believe, in Christianity, are not how Jesus intended them to be.

I write because I see how things can be different and better within Christianity.

I write because I hope to make a difference.

I’m writing this post to hopefully dispel any assumptions.

I write because I am hopeful.

 
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Posted by on October 24, 2012 in spiritual, theology

 

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My First 14er

Getting to the top is optional.

Getting down is Mandatory.

– Ed Viesturs (summited Mt. Everest 7 times)

A couple years ago one of my best friends, Jeremy, asked me if I wanted to climb a “14er” with him. A “14er” is a mountain peak that is more than 14,000 feet tall. I don’t exactly have a well-defined bucket list, but if I did climbing a 14er would be on it. Growing up in Kansas we spent alot of our vacations and spring breaks in Colorado skiing, mountain biking, or hiking in the Rocky Mountains. Colorado has forever been my 2nd…I mean now 3rd favorite state behind my home-state of Kansas and  Well, a couple years ago I was in the middle of helping to plan my wedding. He asked me again last year but we were taking a family vacation at the same time they were going. He asked me again this year…glory be, I was free! The plan was set in motion to climb 14ers, finally. Then it hit me…I’m going to climb a 14er…I better get my butt in shape. I’m in fairly good shape, but playing in and adult soccer and softball league doesn’t exactly qualify as living my life according to a hard-core training regimen. So I set out to construct a training regiment that would at least get me to the top of the mountain and if all else fails I would fall back on gravity to get me back down the mountain – what goes up, must come down.

My training regimen consisted of 2 sets per day of: 40 sit-ups, 10 push-ups, 60 curls per arm (in various manners) of 20 pound weights, 3 minutes of leg-lifts, and finally running  a total of 2 miles per day. The running portion was planned to be very beneficial since we live in an extremely hilly neighborhood – but then tragedy over-zealousness struck me on the softball field. Three weeks before I was to leave for Colorado I was playing in a softball game and while sprinting to chase down a pop-up in foul territory I heard my short-stop yell, “You’ve got room.”, but then I felt my body hit what seemed like a mack-truck when in actuality it was the fence. Apparently I didn’t have enough room. In case you’re wondering, I actually caught the ball but when I hit the fence, in the same manner like cartoon characters who run through a wall and it leaves a cut-out of their body in the wall, I wasn’t that lucky. The fence jarred the ball free and it resulted in being a very dramatic strike 2 on the batter and left me with a wrecked ankle. When I hit the chain-link fence my body hit it and bounced off but my right ankle got caught in one of the holes of the fence and while my body fell my foot was still stuck in the fence and we’ll just say my ankle looked like a beach ball (swollen and colorful) about 15 seconds after the dramatic strike 2. One of my teammates said he thought I was dead since I took a little time to get up and my short-stop who told me, “You’ve got room”, shook his head and apologized repeatedly. Unfortunately my job doesn’t lend itself to staying off my ankle since I have to walk in to speak to the doctors instead of them coming out to my car to speak with me (the nerve), but I’ve normally been a quick healer my whole life and was hoping for that again. Thankfully this was the case again as I was able to start my training regimen again for my first 14er. While my ankle is still not 100% (two weeks after returning from the mountains), it was at least strong enough at the time for the hike.

I’m going to end the word description portion of this post and leave you with a picture description for the remainder of the adventure. All I can say is it was an amazing experience of enjoying God’s creation all around us for 4 days – picturesque scenery, wildlife running free, fresh mountain air, aromatic pine tree scents wafting all around us, babbling brooks of crisp mountain water, cold evenings curled up in our sleeping bags, crisp, early mornings and trying to wake up with our warm coffee, majestic views from just about everywhere, great companionship and dare I say, “fellowship”…and returning to our roots and basics of life and getting away from the phone, email, and civilization. Basic tasks of setting up my tent and pulling out my sleeping bag out of my pack actually left me quite winded and I would have to stop to catch my breath. We saw amazing wildlife – elk across the grassy ravines, mountain goats running and bounding up the rocks in our camp, porcupines walking right outside my tent since my tent was 5 feet from our “kitchen”, marmots and prairie dogs all over the place, and even a Disney movie-esque encounter with a hummingbird who flew into our group, hovered at eye-level, and stared at us as if to say, “Good morning, god-speed and safe travels on your journey gentlemen.”

So we packed everything we needed into our backpacks, used the streams and lakes for our water supply and had a fun and truly spiritual experience. As a bonus, we returned with the same number of people as we left with. 😉

packed and ready to go

on our way to Colorado – Kansas sunflowers

met by rain showers on our way to the trail head

testing the water depth

our caravan fording the water

on our way

you mean we have to hike uphill?

our route to base camp – where the streets have no name

finally at base camp

base camp

my wife slipped a note/pic into my bag and I hung it in my tent

another view from base camp – I look stoked

our friends in base camp

another view from base camp – Cresstone Peak

thar she blows – Humboldt Peak

on our way up to Humboldt Peak

our highway

still on our way up

almost there – don’t look down

finally made it! – Humboldt Peak – 14,064 feet

signing the register at the summit

me and my best friend Jeremy at the summit

view from the summit

another view from the summit

another view from the summit

another view from the summit

backside of the mountain

last view of Humboldt Peak

had an amazing time and hope to do more 14s next year

time to hit the trail and head back to civilization

once we were back in Colorado Springs I gorged myself with a huge piece of medium rare cow

…and a banana split blizzard

 
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Posted by on July 30, 2012 in creation, spiritual

 

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