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Legalistically Content

“If Stanley Hauerwas is correct to assert that most Christians in America today are ‘functional atheists;’ that is, most Christians live in such a way that it makes no difference that God raised Jesus from the dead, then surely even more Christians today are inadvertent heretics, trodding paths of belief the ancient Church long ago labeled dangerous detours.” – Tamed Cynic

Grace. Such a boring, overused, misunderstood, and cliched word. But also a powerful, meaningful and “awefully” refreshing reassurance of how we can have contentment in our lives. Grace can counteract the subversive power of legalism. Normally, when I see a blog-post on “grace”, or “mercy”, or “hope” or any other christian-ese terms I won’t read the post, but hear me out on this one.

Unfortunately legalism is rampant across the evangelical church’s landscape but I see it quite a bit more now that I live in the south and it’s something that needs to be corrected before a person tips too far to the side of a Pelagianistic theology.

Maybe legalism in some way stems from the Enlightenment era that taught us knowledge (or at least the attempt at the accrual of knowledge which to the church meant bible studies, time alone with god, Sunday school, read the Bible in __ days plans etc) is power. Or maybe legalism stems from the Protestant work ethic which has been taken hostage and also misconstrued as an individualistic, American work ethic to pull yourself up by your boot-straps; but no matter where it originated from the legalistic mindset can sink in so perversely within a person that it can trick a person into relying on themselves for rescuing them from a life of sin (“salvation“) instead of recognizing what Christ has already done for them on the cross. Grace. We need to embrace and rest in this word.

Admittedly, I’m a results driven person, I like results; plus I’m in sales and it’s my job to produce results.

RT @BestSalesTips: By setting sharp, clearly defined goals, you can measure and take pride in the achievement of those goals. #selling #sales

The results-oriented mindset obviously works great for my job (my managers smile upon good results) but when the results-oriented mindset carries over into my theology sometimes my spiritual activity (busyness) can be misconstrued by myself as “spiritual results” that I personally have accomplished. This is not a good thing. About ten years ago I came out of the heavily-bunkered-in legalistic camp (mindset) that I was entrenched in for most of my Christian life prior to that point. I was trying to do so many things in my life to please God that I left no room for grace. I used to believe that if I can control my activities then I can drive results and again, results (in my mind) were good so therefore I was reinforcing this behavior on my own by simply being involved in an activity. Do this, do that, pray now, pray like this, serve now, serve here, put your right hand in, put your right hand out, put your right hand in, and shake it all about etc, etc, etc. Well, the evangelical church, to drive involvement into their own Christian ghetto (churches place high emphasis on driving numbers – results) they constructed church programs and activities which unfortunately helped propagate this system in my life which pushed me towards thinking that spiritual activity pleases God and therefore if God is pleased he will “save” me. If you extrapolate that line of thinking out logically, in essence my activities would help me in attaining my own “salvation” so it is up to me to save myself. The “works/legalistic” mindset pushed me further away from the understanding and realization of grace – what Christ had already done for me on the cross.

Not long after trying to be involved in as many church-related activities and individual activities as possible my mind and life had a blowout by ultimately not being able to control everything in my life and I swung the pendulum the other way into a laissez fair, anything goes lifestyle. Bad move too. What happened in that time period is a post for another time.

RT @darrinpatrick: Anyone who tries to control everything in his world ends up with a very, very small world. via @RickWarren

In summation, legalism is man’s attempt at attaining something that the grace of God has already provided. I’ve rambled on a bit but I feel Darrin Patrick (pastor at The Journey Church in St. Louis) has hit the nail on the head with his teaching on legalism and grace. I can wholly identify with what Darrin is talking about in this teaching. If you have 35 minutes to spare (in actuality we all do) you can listen to Darrin’s teaching here, or watch it here.

Like I said before…grace. We need to drop the need for “doing/knowledge” and instead embrace and rest in the contentment and wholeness of this word – grace. Robin Williams epitomizes and illustrates what happens when instead of spitting out what we know, we are able to step back and breathe it all in. (Good Will Hunting)

Contentment via grace because of what Christ did for us.

 

Cheers! Vaya con Dios.

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Posted by on September 8, 2013 in theology

 

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The straight and narrow could stand to be a bit deeper.

“Before Roberta Green and her family joined Redeemer Presbyterian Church, she had one final question. … “Is Redeemer ecumenical or sectarian?” she asked. “Because I grew up deep in the fundamentalist world where every kind of church or believer who was not in our denomination was a heretic and needed to be shunned and I don’t want to be part of a church like that again.” – story from Jim Belcher in Deep Church

sign outside of Searcy, AR

Searcy, AR

…and my personal favorite (please note intended sarcasm)

Benton, AR

I have a strong desire for a better church in my city. Will it happen? I sure hope so. But in the churches I have attended in Little Rock I have found with my theology and my beliefs it’s like I’m stuck somewhere in the middle on the traditional/emergent pendulum. My theology is too liberal for some and too conservative for others. I don’t fall in line with the “traditional evangelical” church (please forgive that label, it is awfully generic) but I also don’t line up with the “emergent” church (also very generic label). I’m somewhere in between. I’m in limbo. I live in a state of dissonance, and as such I’m without a church that strikes that final note to make it a harmonic chord with my beliefs. I’m not looking for a perfect fit, or perfect church, because as long as churches are organized and attended by men and women it will always have a little bit of discord and dissonance. And I think a little bit of dissonance can be a healthy tuning instrument. At the same time I believe there are others here in Little Rock who might feel the same way I do – they find themselves falling somewhere in between and with no church to call home.

Now, I know by saying I desire a better church, it might seem arrogant, and I can understand why it may seem that way. Why should I think my vision for what a church should look like is THE way for a church? It comes across as arrogant, but I promise that is not my intention. I believe there are good churches in Little Rock who have done alot for their attenders and for this city, but I also believe there is always room for improvement. If you believe your church is perfect, well, as I’ve learned in the south when you want to call someone a moron but use different words you say “bless your heart”, so…bless your heart. 😉

I am a voracious reader and most of the time I am reading anywhere from 6-8 books at a time. I’ve read books from both sides of the traditional/ermergent aisle – so to speak – and I can appreciate the different leanings and interpretations from both, but what I don’t get is why there’s the constant bickering and denigrating of the other’s perspectives and beliefs between the two camps. If you’re on twitter you probably know what I’m talking about. There are shots across the bow almost every day from people about different figureheads of both sides. Are we not worshipping the same God?! Some would say no, I say yes! (more on that in the next post)

But for now, I’ve started to read a book by Jim Belcher called Deep Church.

It details a conversation between John Piper and Tony Jones and Doug Pagitt and well, it just didn’t end well. Basically both sides told each other they were unfit to be a pastor.

~~~~ can we get a group hug~~~~

After almost a decade the two sides now are at loggerheads, and it seems the rift will not be healed anytime soon. – Deep Church

Yet the two sides can’t get along. They are hostile to each other, using their writings and conferences to denounce the other side. – Deep Church

…hmmm, maybe not.

So if we can’t get a group hug between the two sides…I want to find a way for myself to live more peaceably and more graciously within my traditional church (for the time being…more on that later) while I’m stuck dangling in the middle between the two.

I’m about 50 pages into the book and so far it’s been a great read. It outlines the traditional church and the emergent church and talks about why they seem diametrically opposed in matters of faith and completely unable to work together or even hold a civil conversation.

Again…are we not worshipping the same God?! Good grief people!

Over the next couple of posts I’m going to outline some of the concerns I have with the traditional church and emergent church and also offer suggestions that can make our theology more in line with how we live our lives meaningfully on earth…which is our future heaven. Wait a second…you don’t think God is going to destroy the earth we’re on now? Nope sure don’t. We need to be aware that our theology and how we interact with our culture and what we think about heaven and earth impacts how we live our lives today.

If you’re like me and find yourself stuck in the middle between the traditional and emergent churches and you’re wondering what to do about it I highly recommend checking out Deep Church by Jim Belcher. It (so far) is giving a fresh perspective of finding a balance and a deeper meaning to my faith than what is currently presented in the church I attend.

Maybe it’s time for a new church in Little Rock…a, shall we say, Deep Church. (a bit of foreshadowing perhaps? 😉

 
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Posted by on March 22, 2012 in culture, theology

 

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Oh to undo what’s been done in “1000 Years”

I’m posting an email (once upon a time people actually communicated this way) from a friend who was answering a question I asked about the lyrics of one of his songs which was compelling and provocative (in a good way). This friend was the lead singer of my favorite band, Shaking Tree. The shows his band put on were second to none and he is a lyrical genius. Unfortunately his band is no longer touring because as he put it, “They had to grow up and get real jobs.” so he is now in law school…whether or not becoming a lawyer is a real job or not is beside the point. 😉 This email is from a few years back, but still very relevant to this day about how the wider world views religion and Christians. Note: the way most view Jesus is normally very different than how most view Christians. I disagree with some parts and agree with most parts of the email but I’m not posting this to refute, or condone, but to allow the readers of my blog to consider the truths which Dain speaks of and to see how you can see God in Dain. I hope he’s strumming on his guitar and we’re throwing back beers together just like in college whenever we both get to the big Kansas in the sky. {I have corrected spelling so as not to be distracting from the message}

“Hey Derek,

About “1000 Years”…I really don’t like to get into my own views about Christianity and the church too much. In matters concerning faith I find that sometimes the things that one person finds ridiculous, is the core to someone elses spiritual perspective. As someone whose views, in spiritual matters, are not common place in main stream society, I recognize that we all walk down different paths externally and internally to find answers regarding our souls and our purpose. Because of that, I’m not interested in trying to completely uproot anyone’s internal beliefs. As a songwriter I’m just as concerned about what people think when they hear a song than what I am actually writing about. The meaning of most songs should change according to who is listening and what personal experiences the song reminds them of.

All that being said, my views about “1000 Years” have stayed consistent since I first wrote the song. I never intended for this song to be speaking about just religious leaders, but anyone who uses a doctrine that is intended to have absolute truths (the Bible, the Koran, Mein Kampf) with no room to compromise or adjust any principle, for political gain and control of a population.

I guess I wasn’t trying to strike a loud chord with this song, down with religion or anything like that, but just to make people think. Not about religion per se but about religion and politics. As someone who has read the Bible I would be extremely frightened if we, as a country, decided to prepare for the prophecies of Revelations. Also, what I see now is a political movement to christianize our schools, government, and the way law is decided and practiced. I have seen a few church leaders speak out against this fundamentalist movement, but I don’t see it as being effective. The fundamentalist/conservatives yell much louder. Like the song says (truth lacks the convictions of passionate lies) and the Bible is full of contradictions. The ability for debate is slowly eroding in this country because the argument that, “Jesus said…” can and has overridden many peoples sense of humanity and reason, especially in the great state of Kansas and to an extent in our policy in the middle east. This is not to say that religious concerns cannot be valid in a democracy, but with the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, the complexity of terrorism, individual rights and religions age-old bigotry towards science (and in many cases life saving science) I don’t see how theses issues can be solved by a more moderate form of christianity without disregarding part of the message that the bible promotes in the same way the conservative/fundamentalist do. I hope that the moderates are able to combat this path that we seem to be heading in.

Anyway, in a nutshell this is what goes on in my head. I hope I didn’t say anything offensive because I’m never really sure where people are coming from and outside of the political arena I’m extremely supportive of others’ beliefs even if they don’t even closely connect with my own. The cool things about music is that once the song is out of the writer’s hands, its meaning becomes the listeners regardless of the writer’s intention. I’m always a little reluctant to talk about songs because of this. The last thing I want to do is ruin a song for someone. Anyway–I’ll see you on Thursday –take care.   — Dain

This is me again.  Below are the lyrics of “1000 Years” to see what Dain is talking about in the description of his views on religion; if you want to hear the song, just let me know – it’s phenomenal.

Shepherds in Bethlehem wait for him to be born, what will man do in his name? They will call him a god, they will look for the marks, every free soul there will pay.

Whispers of innocence drowned out in tears, everyone must choose a side, truth lacks conviction of passionate lies, the sin is too fragile, to hurt us inside!

1000 die by some man’s foolish pride, 1000 lost to God and all his lies, 1000 loaves soon replaced by fear, it hasn’t changed in 1000 years. 1000 screams lost within the air, 1000 lives buried in the sand, 1000 mommas soon replaced by tears, it has changed within 1000 years.

Politicians and preachers corrupt from inside, ask us to lay down like lambs. They will say they’re for love they will talk of compassion, question ’em and they skate along.

Whispers of innocence drowned out in tears, everyone must choose a side, truth lacks conviction of passionate lies, the sin is too fragile, to hurt us inside!”

1000 die by some man’s foolish pride, 1000 lost to God and all his lies, 1000 loaves soon replaced by fear, hasn’t changed in 1000 years. 1000 screams lost within the air, 1000 lives buried in the sand, 1000 mommas soon replaced by tears, it has changed within 1000 years.

Whispers of innocence drowned out in tears, everyone must choose a side, truth lacks conviction of passionate lies, the sin is too fragile, to hurt us inside!”

1000 die by some man’s foolish pride, 1000 lost to God and all his lies, 1000 loaves soon replaced by fear, hasn’t changed in 1000 years. 1000 screams lost within the air, 1000 lives buried in the sand, 1000 mommas soon replaced by tears, it has changed within 1000 years.

Later this week I’ll be upgrading my space to include the songs, but until then you can check out: Dain and Dain on myspace You can buy some of his music on iTunes, unfortunately you can’t buy my two favorite songs of his, “Complications” (that I actually was able to record with him!) and “1000 Years”. But again, I have both of these if you want to hear them.

 
 

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alt#View post for eikon blog

When Ryan told me I could write an uncensored blog my first thought was to preach why everybody should seek to repeal the tobacco tax, or why the Kansas Jayhawks are awesome, or why Arkansas needs much colder weather, but most of you have heard those discourses from me many times over.  Instead I decided to write a parable on the relationship of Christ’s redemptive work on the cross and our limited tolerance of theological diversity. Hopefully it will make sense.

I work as a sales representative for a nebulizer company and I call on pediatricians in clinics and hospitals.  My role is to convince doctors why they need to use my company as their supplier of nebulizers.  First of all, a Nebulizer is a device used to deliver medication in the form of a mist which is inhaled into the lungs in order to improve breathing.  The bottom line for a nebulizer is to get the patient breathing better so they can live a healthier life.

In the medical industry there are many companies who manufacture nebulizers, so how do we know which one is “right”?  Well, essentially all nebulizers are the same, but there is one major non-negotiable in regards to nebulizers. The patient probably will not fully understand the pharmacological efficacy of the device so the non-negotiable aspect is the patient needs to appreciate that the treatment itself is going to make their life better; not perfect, but better. Our society sometimes places too high a value on trying to figure everything out, but there are some aspects of the nebulizer and the treatment that are beyond most people’s comprehension.  The beauty of the matter is not in knowing how the treatment works but the fact that the treatment does work.

Essentially, all nebulizers are the same and have the same desired outcome: breathing better because of the treatment.  But there are some minor differences. Some have a better treatment time, some a higher respirable fraction, and some are more portable, but in choosing a nebulizer sometimes the deciding factor needs to be what allows the treatment to have a deeper deposition with the patient.

In finishing, a sales representative with my company told me about a conversation she had with a doctor about how our company started.  She told the doctor how several years ago our owners broke off from the original company to start their own nebulizer company because of differing interpretations of the business contract. The original company sued our owners and then our owners countersued; all the while both companies are still to this day trying to gain market-share over each other. The doctor’s comment, “That’s a lot of drama over nebulizers.”

I agree with the doctor.  I want him to use my nebulizers but I realize I am biased about what nebulizer delivers a better treatment.  But all the doctors and companies agree that the main thing needed for making breathing and living better…is the treatment.

Legend:

nebulizer = denomination/religion

doctor = pastor

treatment = God’s redemptive work in a person’s life

patient = a person

breathing better = following Christ

healthier life = bringing God’s kingdom to earth

 
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Posted by on December 22, 2009 in culture, theology

 

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book review by Tad

I thought Tad wrote a great, brief synopsis on the book, “Why We’re Not Emergent (By Two Guys Who Should Be)” so I’ve linked to it.   Tad also touches on mis-conceptions/misunderstandings that happen when non-emergent people critiquing emergent theology and emergent people.  Labels is as labels does when it comes to emergent, but we’re confined to the system others have created with semantics.  Check it out.

Tad\’s Blog

 
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Posted by on September 18, 2009 in theology

 

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all cuddly in the ghetto

Here’s a snippet of a couple conversations with good friends on facebook recently and a possible conversation between a ‘christian’ and God. (to clarify, the possible conversation is definitely not a reflection of the people I had the actual conversations with (those friends asked me questions which I further clarified with my comments) but rather about christians in general who are firmly and staunchly planted in the christian ghetto and say repeatedly, I can’t wait to be in heaven and off of this wretched earth.)

status: Just like Christ rebuked the Pharisees, who would Christ rebuke if he were here today?…

me:  The motivation of my original status…I was reading Matthew 23 and verses 13-36 kindof stood out with those who I respect who are challenging peoples’ paradigms (mclaren, pagitt, bell, etc) but get called heretics by other christians. just my four half-pennies for the day. 🙂

friend:  Why is it a big deal that other Christians call them heretics if they bad mouth other Christians themselves?

me:  I think I phrased that poorly. They’re not challenging people directly – they’re (McLaren, Bell, etc) are writing their views on theology and sometimes it indirectly challenges conventional and fundamentalists’ views on theology. In fact, McLaren, and Bell, repeatedly say that if what they write is ‘upsetting’ to them then it’s better for the reader not to read what they write. Plus, name-calling just isn’t the best way to emulate Christ.

So what’s the point of my little rant and my friend’s honest question? Well, here’s another thread from a conversation I had with another friend at nearly the same time.

me: “I think a lot of people up until recently have primarily focused on an after-life faith and ensuring that we have a fire-insurance policy so we don’t burn as sinners in the hands of an angry God. Edwards is just one I picked on, unfairly, b/c of his famous sermon that speaks about sinners going to hell and burning forever (some would disagree with his view of hell let alone the attitude of the sermon). In the south, as you are, primarily what I hear from ‘christians’ is how non-X’s need to turn or burn. Maybe it’s me, but I don’t respond well to threats.

I think we should hold our views of hell and heaven with great respect but in addition God cares about the earth that he created, ‘your kingdom your will be done, ON EARTH as it is in heaven is often forgotten. So we need to align our focus with bringing God’s kingdom to earth. There’s a prominent sign on I-30 that says, “Warning, Prepare to Meet God.” That sign, I believe does more harm than good for God. Chris acted with love. He didn’t chastise the prostitute, nor rebuke many people other than the pharisees…who in my opinion are just like (some) modern day Christians….

yeah, that’s why I was saying I unfairly lumped Edwards in with the comment. I’ve read commentaries on the sermon, but not the actual sermon – it’s actually more that some people I come in contact with here in Little Rock that have misplaced the focus…but that’s a haughty statement for me to make b/c it makes it sound like I have it all figured out’ which I definitely don’t. 🙂 It just discourages me when people pass off culture and the earth as ‘bad’. God created it and us and loves everything in it.”

So now again, what’s the point of all of what I just copied and pasted?  I believe that sometimes we as Christians lie to ourselves (sometimes inadvertently) about what matters and try to advance ourselves to heaven and in doing so we do more to destruct God’s kingdom here on earth.  In essence we’re saying, “To hell with earth!” which could be construed as, “God I don’t give a damn about what you created (the earth) I just want to get away from it all and be all cuddly with you in the Christian ghetto.”

God’s question in response might be: “what about your fellow man?”

you: “to hell with him, I want to be cuddly in the ghetto.”

God: “and hunger?”

you: “to hell with it, I want to be cuddly in the ghetto.”

God: “and poverty?”

you: “to hell with it, I want to be cuddly in the ghetto.”

God: and the Earth which I created?

you: “to hell with it, I want to be cuddly in the ghetto.”

God: “Really? So you’re almost like a gnostic?  Ok.  I need a drink. Jesus get in here; and bring some water with you to make some wine!”

 
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Posted by on September 16, 2009 in theology

 

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Leslie Winkle vs Mr. Keating (arrogance vs humility)

This post shows two different schools of thought (close-mindedness and open-mindedness) in how our worldviews affect how we live our lives.   The post is not necessarily one cogent thought; but I believe if I don’t spell everything out you can take time to think about parallel instances in your life…if so desired.

I agree with much of what I say, but not everything. – Peter Rollins

arrogance

vs

humility

Way back in the euphoric days of college, I listened to a great speaker who was an extremely compelling speaker.  What made him compelling (besides his topics) was the creative way he intertwined media with his talks; he kept all of us on the edge of our seats wondering what he would include next.  The speaker had the ability to use books, movies, and music to evoke authentic responses from the audience.  He would use clips of “Braveheart” when appealing to the guys and then use clips of “Sense and Sensibilities” when appealing to the girls. (granted some girls are going to say, ‘hey, I love “Braveheart!”, which very well could be true, but in most instances it won’t affect girls like it does guys – the same is primarily true in reverse for girls relating to “Sense and Sensibilities”).  I digress…the way he used clips was not done in a cheesy, manipulative manner, but in a manner that required pause for reflection. Now, I do not want to compare this post to the quality of what he did, but I am going to attempt to make use of media in a similar manner as him. Movies, music, and books are profound motivators and powerful platforms in our society

This is a clip from one of my favorite tv shows, “The Big Bang Theory”.  The primary characters are Leonard (Johnny Galecki), Sheldon (Jim Parsons), Raj (Kunal Nayyar), Penny (Kaley Cuoco), and Howard (Simon Helberg). There is also a guest star Leslie Winkle (Sara Gilbert).  You might recognize Leslie and Leonard from the tv show “Roseanne”.  The show is about genius friends who with all their quirks have to live life together in a somewhat manageable community while they process their relationships from their own scientific, logical worldviews.

The premise of the first clip in this post is to talk about how our inability to consider alternatives might close off more perceptive ideas and ideologies than what we think we know, or at the very least our close-mindedness might prevent us from learning more about other points of view. View the youtube clip from minutes 3:50-4:40 (I’ve included the full text of the conversation below this whole post – which includes a section of the discussion that was not included in the clip.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgMn8at7vA8&feature=related

This next clip is from my all-time favorite movie. “Dead Poets Society”. It speaks of branching out and viewing things from a different perspective.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2EdWgsTUhmI

And finally just some quotes from C.S. Lewis’s, “The Great Divorce”.

“Ah, but we must all interpret those beautiful words in our own way! For me there is no such thing as a final answer.  The free wind of inquiry must always continue to blow through the mind, must it not? “Prove all things”…to travel hopefully is better than to arrive.’” pg. 40

“Before me green slopes made a wide amphitheatre, enclosing a frothy and pulsating lake into which, over many-coloured rocks, a waterfall was pouring. Here once again I realized that something had happened to my senses so that they were now receiving impressions which would normally exceed their capacity.  On Earth, such a waterfall could not have been perceived at all as a whole; it was too big.  Its sound would have been a terror in the woods for twenty miles.   Here, after the first shock, my sensibility exulted.  The noise, though gigantic, was like giants’ laughter: like the revelry of a whole college of giants together laughing, dancing, singing, roaring at their high works.” pgs. 45-46

My closing thoughts:

Sometimes we are sure in what we know and in what we want and in what we believe, and that might be ok, at times, but if we don’t at least have the humility to say, “I agree with much of what I say, but not everything.” then we might be setting ourselves up for a lot of tremors in our worldviews.  Personally I’d rather travel hopefully than to call it all off because we can’t agree on loopy or non-loopy space theories.

(full text of conversation from “The Big Bang Theory”)

Sheldon:  I will graciously overlook the fact that she is an arrogant sub-par scientist who actually believes loop quantum gravity better unites quantum mechanics with general relativity than does string theory.

Leslie:  Hang on a second, loop quantum gravity clearly offers more testable predictions than string theory.

Sheldon:  I’m listening, amuse me.

Leslie:  Ok, well for one thing we expect quanti-space time to manifest itself as minute differences than the speed of light for different colors.

Sheldon:  Balderadash. Matter clearly consists of tiny strings.

Leslie to Leonard: Are you going to let him talk to me like that?

(Leonard with a baffled, helpless look on his face)

Leonard:  Ok, well there is a lot of merit to both theories.

Leslie:  No there isn’t. Only loop quantum gravity calculates the entropy of black holes.

(Sheldon giggles under his voice)

Leonard:  Sheldon, don’t make that noise it’s disrespectful

Sheldon:  I should hope so it was a snort of derision.

Leslie:  You agree with me right? Loop quantum gravity is the future of physics.

Leonard:  Sorry Leslie, I guess I prefer my space theories not loopy.

Leslie:  Well, I guess I’m glad I found out the truth about you before this went any further.

Leonard:  Truth, what truth? We’re talking about untested hypotheses…look, it’s no big deal.

Leslie:  Oh, it isn’t? Really?  Tell me Leonard, how will we raise the children?

(keep in mind they’ve been dating for 1 evening)

(Leonard and Sheldon with extremely baffled looks on their faces)

Leonard:  I…I guess we wait until they’re old enough and let them choose their own theory.

Leslie:  We can’t let them choose Leonard; they’re children!

(Leslie storms toward the door)

Leonard:  Wait, where are you going?

Leslie:  I’m sorry. I could’ve accepted our kids being genetically unable to eat ice cream or ever get a good view of a parade. But this?  This is a deal breaker.

(Leslie leaves)

Sheldon:  Look on the bright side…

(and he attempts  to proceed to bring levity to the situation)

 
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Posted by on July 23, 2009 in theology

 

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