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“Jesus Juke” vs the Bible is Ancient, Ambiguous, Diverse (credit to Jon Bowles)

Today’s perspective: the bible is Ancient – don’t forget that.

These thoughts below are derived/quoted directly and semi-paraphrased because my fingers couldn’t type fast, from Jon Bowles (pastor at Beggars Table) in his sermon series of “sacred responsibility” from September 17, 2019. I don’t like cherry picking thoughts because it’s akin to when people cherry pick specific bible verses in order to solely support their narrative…but alas, I did. 😊 Link to entire sermon provided below.

https://overcast.fm/+EutWFmidk

“Ancient, ambiguous and diverse. We are 3000 years removed from king David. … We are as distant from King David as the folks who will live in Kansas City in the year 5000. Not the year 2050, the year 5000. … We have to respect the distance that the writers of the Bible lived a long long time ago and far away. … They would be freaked out by a zipper. … They are shaped by the time and place that they live and when they lived. They, like us, can only work from what they know. I can not write a complete treatise for how to think and how to behave for the people in Kansas City in the year 5000. I can’t do it because I have no idea who those people are. You and I are the same way for the people who lived in king David’s reign.”

Now, my (Derek’s) sidebar thoughts.

1) Keep these thoughts (above) from Jon in mind when saying something contained within the bible is “biblical”. Yes, technically it’s biblical because it is contained in the Bible but we tend to forget to look at the ultimate themes, intended audience and the context around a passage. It’s like when people used the Bible to support slavery – christians would just rather forget that it ever happened, but I hope christians don’t EVER forget it happened but instead learn to be more discerning to understand when we see the misuse of scripture.

Or on the lighter side, the ending of Dexter, we would just rather forget about that train wreck. Ok, train wreck might be hyperbolic but it was more illustrative than any other adjective I could think of. I digress, the ending was so hurried and felt so forced that a good series will just waft in the wind with their poor attempt at wrapping up the series.

More on the initial point later in a future blog post…maybe*. The post will dive more into the reason behind the reason.

2) People ask why I don’t wrote more often, the truth is I write quite often but most of the time after I write a blogpost I never actually post it on my blog. Not sure exactly why not…it might be because just the act of writing it is cathartic enough, or maybe it’s because in regards to my writing I’m a perfectionist and I just never take the time to clean it up so it’s post-worthy. I’m thinking it’s a combination of both of those reasons.

3) Additionally, I keep my “deeper” theological thoughts off of Facebook and on my blog. So if you access my blog, which you did if you’re reading this then it’s your own fault for what you’re opening yourself up to. 😆 People don’t need to have theology or politics unwillingly peppered at them because most people will dodge those posts in the same way Neo dodged bullets in the Matrix.

4) *Maybe I’ll start posting some of the posts I did not end up posting.

5) Enjoy today’s ridiculous christian picture, which includes a VERY white Jesus.

The ultimate Jesus juke

 
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Posted by on December 9, 2019 in spiritual, theology

 

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Explanation/Excommunication Part II – The Excommunication

The Excommunication 

Why is there a (very much delayed) second (and third) part to this post? Well, this is a follow-up to my first post and is what actually happened to me (and my wife), and in the next part I’ll examine “why” it happened. I will bring up some ideas/thoughts of why what happened in our community group actually happened. Make sense? In essence, I am going to look at the reason behind the reason.

What happened 

Earlier this year…well actually, earlier last year (2012), my wife and I were asked to leave our community group. Over 2 1/2 years ago my wife and I had joined this community group through the church we used to attend, and we had been part of this community group since the beginning of our marriage. The reason two of the guys were asking us to leave was that in their opinion, and in their words, I was bitter, and divisive with my opinions of their church, and also that I was posting negative thoughts (on social media) about their church that made them feel defensive. They told me I could remain in the community group if I stopped posting the things I had been posting, and that I had 48 hours to decide if I would comply with their demands…I mean their desires. 😉

Rush to Judgment

First of all, their accusations were completely off-base. Unless there is something completely egregious done by a specific church I don’t post about any one specific church. I post about the “church at large”. I did have one blog post about a year ago from a sermon I heard at our former church that really irked me, but in all other examples I posted in generalities about “the church at large”. I guess somehow they had a bit of narcissism built into the things I post where they thought everything I talked about was about their church. On their last complaint it almost brought me to the point of laughter, is that one of them went so far as to say that he felt uncomfortable with what I post because he believed people would associate what I would post as representing his thoughts and views. WTF?!?! Wow. That comment totally blew me away. That type of attitude is full-fledged narcissism. But now the whole “excommunication” has had time to blow over; in a way can still be a bit irksome (not sure if that is really a word) but in actuality it’s just simply comical and laughable. What happened in that community group is no way representative of true community. My wife and I now just laugh at the whole situation. While she doesn’t always condone what I post…and truth be told she sometimes cringes when I proudly proclaim, “I blogged!”, she overall respects and supports my beliefs and supports the avenues in which I express them. I love my wife!

Me and Wifey

Me and the Wifey

Now I will admit, none of this would have happened if I knew how to keep my fat, pie-hole shut about things that the church (at large) does that upsets me. (if you need a reminder of why I post what I post see my last post: The Explanation) But please understand what I am saying: the things that I posted & tweeted, that the guys were upset about, (which were not anything over the top or crazy!) are the the things where I feel the church has missed the mark on and missed the reason the church is in existence. In fact, I’m more discouraged with them as Christians in their beliefs and most of all their handling of the situation that they tried to squash what I had to say. And I honestly feel so strong about how much the church has bastardized its mission and how neglectful the church is being towards those who need assistance that I can’t keep my feelings to myself. Spending millions of dollars on audio/video equipment (which many churches do) while people in our streets go hungry is merely one example. When I post/talk about these issues I don’t bring them up in a spiteful manner; I speak from the heart for why it upsets me. I can handle less than perfect acoustics in a church if it means others can have food to eat, or healthcare for their illness. A while back my wife and I visited a church that was a beautiful church building with concrete floors, grandiose vaulted ceilings, and a sound system that by the looks of it might have cost $10,000. Were the acoustics the best? Not by any means, but I can honestly say I had a more worshipful experience that Sunday than at any other church here in Little Rock. (We also got a pretty good aerobic workout because it was an anglican church which meant we were doing a lot of up, down, kneel, up, down, kneel, up, down, kneel. I digress…)

Thou has committed a grave sin! “Say What?!”

The manner in which these two guys “confronted” me about their issues with me, and also in the weeks leading up to it (they never responded to emails and texts that I had sent to both of them with honest questions and concerns), and also the way they kept me in the dark with their feelings towards what I posted and never voiced any disapproval until they gave me their ultimatum of “stop posting or get out”, and the fact that they gave me such a ridiculous ultimatum, it was very clear to me and my wife that we would not remain in that community group. And I ended up letting them know our decision just right before their 48 hour deadline expired (I wanted to create a little soap-opera-esque drama 😉  The way they handled the entire situation honestly almost felt like I had committed some huge sin and they were enacting “church discipline” on me. In no way whatsoever was what went down in this situation a reflection of good, true, meaningful community. Again, it was just absolutely 100% absurd.

Why are we so quick to eliminate and/or paint people as miscreants when they hold a different point of view than what we hold? It seems like Christians have no tolerance whatsoever.

I Must Break You…But In Case I Can’t Please Just Go Away.

 

Of all religions, the Christian is without doubt 

the one which should inspire tolerance most, 

although up to now the Christians 

have been the most intolerant of all men.

– Voltaire

The longer you are removed, chronologically, 

from your conversion the more likely it is 

that you’re going to struggle with self-righteousness.

– Darrin Patrick

Spiritual security comes when we stop being anxious about others and begin to watch after ourselves. 

– Teresa of Avila

Faith afraid to think is unbelief masked in piety. 

Unbelief afraid to think is pseudo-faith 

with Enlightenment trimmings. 

– G. Ebeling tweeted by @trippfuller

Do the hard work of questioning your doubts, 

not just the easy work of raising them. 

– @Jonathan_Dodson

Let us test and examine our ways, and return to the Lord! 

– Lamentations 3:40

I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy,

as cause for withdrawing from a friend. – Thomas Jefferson 

“Humility is born when we acknowledge our biases and the limitations of our perspectives. … An important part of life is learning to see things from different perspectives rather than simply judging those who don’t agree. I am a person of faith. I believe we are supposed to cooperate with each other instead of comparing ourselves to one another. I believe that each person on this planet is unique and different – a Masterpiece. The hues of melanin add beauty and the myriad of philosophies and perspectives make me consider and evaluate what I most deeply believe. Faith is supposed to encourage me to courageously explore all of life, not to fear the unknown. Faith is supposed to teach me to trust that God is with me wherever I go, not to rely on sight alone. This means that there are times when the perspectives and schemas I’ve developed to process life must be completely torn down and rebuilt when new and challenging viewpoints are presented.” 

– Ethan D. Bryan, “Run Home & Take a Bow, Stories of Life, Faith And a Season With The Kansas City Royals”

Building off of Ethan’s great quote (from his book which I highly recommend!!)…as Yoda would say…

“You must unlearn what you have learned”, pretty wise teaching from Jedi master Yoda. We must be willing to not rush in so quickly to judge people, but instead see what we can learn from others…but I’ll delve more into that in part 3.

So after going through all of this ridiculousness over the past 6 months it got me thinking about how some Christians treat other people (and yes, even how some Christians treat other Christians), and how some people deal with others who who hold different views. It’s honestly a bit discouraging when you think about it.

Eliminate?

Acclimate?

Tolerate?

What is the right way to handle those who have different belief-systems? It seems simple when you think about, but what we believe we should do and what we actually do are sometimes two entirely different things. The ole “ought/is” debate. It’s always fun. 🙂

1) Why we treat some people the way we do, 2) a glimpse of what should’ve happened in my community group, and 3) what can be learned from the whole crazy situation, are topics I’ll dive into in part III. (I promise it won’t be as long of a time-frame to post part III. 😉

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on January 30, 2013 in community, culture, spiritual, theology

 

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The Explanation and The Excommunication

(part 1 of 2)

The Explanation

I wanted to wait awhile before I posted this series of posts because I was pretty ticked about something that happened recently (more on what actually happened later) and wanted to make sure I wasn’t writing this from a knee-jerk reaction of being ticked – however, this specific post was inspired by what actually happened. And after waiting, processing what happened, and reflecting back I think I’ve reached a good point of levity to spell things out honestly and objectively while intertwining my own take of what went on – as weird and off-base as it was…but most of that is in the second part of this post that I will post in a couple days.

This post is an explanation of why I write and post about what I write and post.

Some thing compels me, therefore I write. 

Provoking a reaction isn’t the same thing as saying something significant.

– Calvin, from Calvin and Hobbes

Let me dispel any myths, or incorrect assumptions, about why I write, tweet, and post, right off the bat: I’m not a bitch-and-moan type of person and I’m not bitter towards the church or towards Christians. I’m not. Bitter and negative people actually annoy me…alot. Plus, that type of an attitude or mindset gets you nowhere other than being cynical and focusing on the negative things in life. If you surf the internet or flip on the TV you will be flooded with all kinds of information about what’s wrong with this world. Bad things happen where we work and there are things that happen in our families that we can’t control, and I choose not to waste my time focusing on those things because that would just beat me down. I don’t ignore the negative things that happen – it needs to be fixed or corrected if possible, but I choose not to focus on it being bad and instead choose to see what is possible – how things could be better. Another way to look at is, if I was apathetic to an issue I wouldn’t be voicing any concern, because it wouldn’t matter to me – but I actually care about what I write about. You won’t see me writing about the WNBA or NASCAR or gardening tips because mainly I don’t care about those things. You won’t see me giving fashion tips, or hair-styling ideas (honestly, have you seen my hair?…or lack thereof). Again, because I don’t care about those things.

I just don’t care.

I mean, I care to some extent in the fact that NASCAR is a sport and I like sports, and in regards to fashion I don’t want to dress like a slob; but that’s the extent of those examples. They don’t interest me enough to delve into. So I write about things that truly matter to me.

I deeply care about Christianity. I care about how we as Christians have withdrawn from culture and taken an “individualism is king”/evacuation theology approach to our faith. Also, I think it’s rather important that we as the church examine how churches are appropriating our money (that is another post I’m writing that is coming in the near future and I’m pretty sure it’ll piss off some people; but if some people get pissed off I’m not that concerned about it considering there are people dying in the streets while churches spend umpteen millions of dollars on buildings, lights, and audio/video equipment – that wastefulness and ignoring of what Jesus told us to do really brings out Grumpy Derek; and Jesus was just kidding about that whole “Feed my sheep” idea, wasn’t he?). All that stuff matters to me so I write about it. But I’m not bitter. I don’t bitch and moan. I don’t say things to solely provoke a reaction and piss people off. I would like to think I provoke people to action. Or if nothing else, if that action is to solely think about what we as Christians are doing or what we could be doing then that’s a-ok with me. That’s a step.

“He who begins by loving Christianity more than Truth,will proceed by loving his sect or church better than Christianity, and end in loving himself better than all.” – Samuel Taylor Coleridge

I’m not a SAD person.

A couple weeks ago I went to North Central Arkansas for work and on my drive back home to Little Rock I was talking to a friend on the phone. I wasn’t paying attention to how fast I was going but to my chagrin the police officer coming from the other direction was paying attention to my speed. He turned around and pulled me over and thankfully this fine officer of the law only gave me a warning (and a racing heartbeat), when he definitely could’ve given me a healthy sized ticket (I might have possibly been going 67mph in a 55mph speed limit). But the funny part was before he handed me the warning he needed to write down my license plate information and his comment to me was, “Ha, that’s funny! I haven’t seen a license plate that spells “SAD”. I told him that I was very disappointed when I went to get my license plate and just by dumb-luck my license plate actually spelled “SAD”. I told him I was an optimist. He laughed. I laughed. I drove home with my eyes glued to my speedometer.

So…like I mentioned, some people have misunderstood things I’ve written or moreso the manner and reason behind why I write about topics on my blog, Facebook, and Twitter, in regards to the Church-at-large and because of that I’m writing this post to explain some things. Let me also remind you, you can ALWAYS ask me for clarification. Don’t just assume I mean something if you’re not exactly clear what I mean. Again, this is what happened recently and it honestly ticked me off (it brought out Grumpy Derek) because these people who I had been in a community group with for more than two years conferred with each other, not with me, and formed their own wrong conclusions about my intentions, made a decision, and gave me an ultimatum, instead of asking me what I actually meant. Going to the source for clarification..what a novel idea. Grab a beer and hang out with me and you’ll get to know me and what I’m like…but if you want to draw your own assumptions I can’t help that. Unfortunately, that’s what happened, and I thought these guys knew me. Nope. (I hope all this foreshadowing will compel you to read part 2 and continue to read my blog in the future. 😉

Seriously, I’m actually a pretty cheery kind of guy.

…ok, but not over the top like Jim Carrey in “The Truman Show”.

“Lucy, you’ve got some ‘splainin’ to do.”/The Explanation.

So…due to this recent confusion (read crazy-ass assumptions), I have felt the need to clarify topics that I write about, and more importantly the manner/attitude in which I write them. I write, post on facebook, and tweet about alot of different topics: theology, politics, books, culture, the Church, trends in Christianity, world-views, KU sports, cigars, beer, and more. But when I post, tweet, or write things about the Church 97% of the time (I have no idea of the actual percentage, but I would imagine 97% is pretty dog-gone close) I write about the “church-at-large” – Church with a capital “C”; not about individual, specific churches. The only time I will single out a specific church is if I know they’re doing something so egregiously bad it’s reprehensible…or if they are doing something amazingly good.

Let me share my background briefly. I moved to Little Rock in 2008 and from day one I have had a hell-ish church experience for many reasons I won’t go into right now; I have attended 4 churches in Little Rock and am currently church-less. Going back a bit further: since I graduated college in 1999 I have lived in 5 metropolitan areas and have seen the Church trends I talk about happen all over the country.  But the one thing I hold onto that gives me hope is I attended 2 churches (one in Kansas City, Beggars Table, and one in St. Louis, The Journey) who  have given me hope of what church here in Little Rock can look like and I guess I’m just crazy enough to believe I can help to be a part of the change that needs to happen. But again, I bring up my background in all of the cities to say that I’ve seen the trends that I write about happen all across the country. I’m not picking on any one church in Little Rock. Like I mentioned before, unless there is a specific issue happening at a specific church (egregiously good or egregiously bad) I try not to single out any one church by name – most of the time it’s not beneficial and just not necessary. If I did that it would be akin to when a cop sees a group of 10 cars speeding on the highway and pulls over just one person and only gives them a ticket while the other 9 cars continue speeding down the highway without getting in any trouble. Even though the person who got the ticket is guilty of speeding it sucks that they were singled out and given the ticket, while all the other speeders were not pulled over. Many churches in the area are all guilty of the same thing so why pick on one individually? Bring up the issue and take action to make things better. Don’t just bitch and moan about things that go wrong. Do something about it. My hope is to help start a new church in Little Rock similar to Beggars Table and the Journey and some good things are starting to happen.

Wrapping up

I write because I enjoy writing.

I write about things I care about.

I write out of deep conviction.

I write because it is cathartic.

I write because I believe things can be better than how they currently are.

I write because I believe some things we as Christians currently do/believe, in Christianity, are not how Jesus intended them to be.

I write because I see how things can be different and better within Christianity.

I write because I hope to make a difference.

I’m writing this post to hopefully dispel any assumptions.

I write because I am hopeful.

 
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Posted by on October 24, 2012 in spiritual, theology

 

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Moses the Power Broker

I’ll be posting the next part of ‘Ship Christians Only Can Say? soon, but I read this short post from Mike Metzger and had to post it.

Why institutions matter. Everything that follows is from Mike Metzger. Enjoy!

—   —  —   —   —   —   —   —   —   —   —   —   —   —   —  —   —   —   —   —   —   —   —   —   —   —

It’s stunning that while Christians understand marriage as an institution established by God, most evangelical Christians are anti-institutional. They imagine institutions as cold, calculating corporations. This explains why evangelical Christianity is often so powerless to affect real change in the world. It has become, as Theodore Roszak, a Professor of History at California State University memorably put it, “socially irrelevant, even if privately engaging.” The proper exercise of power requires a proper understanding of institutions.

Power is translating authority into action. Having authority is having dominion. Jesus said all authority has been given to him. He has delegated authority to Christians (what is known as the Great Commission). We don’t have authority over all creation, but do have it over spheres of creation, such as a local business or school. Power is the capacity to translate wherever we have authority into action. Without this power, our faith is socially irrelevant, even if privately engaging. This power comes internally from the Spirit of God and instrumentally from institutions.

The best book on this – other than the Bible – is Robert A Caro’s masterful tome on Robert Moses, called “The Power Broker.” In studying the life and impact of Moses, Caro learned about the power of institutions. It began with an “epiphany about power” in the early ’60s. Moses got approval for a bridge from Rye, N.Y., across Long Island Sound to Oyster Bay – a bridge so atrociously big that it would disrupt tides. Caro never imagined Moses getting approval. He had been incredibly naïve. “I got in the car and drove home to Long Island, and I kept thinking to myself: ‘Everything you’ve been doing is baloney. You’ve been writing under the belief that power in a democracy comes from the ballot box. But here’s a guy who has never been elected to anything, who has enough power to turn the entire state around, and you don’t have the slightest idea how he got it.’ ”

Moses got his power by heading, or sitting on the boards of, most of the most influential institutions in the city. I’ll be telling you more about this in an upcoming column. But this does raise a few questions.

Questions to ask:

  • Does your church know which are the most influential institutions in your city?
  • Does your church have a plan to head, or sit on the boards of, most of the most influential institutions in your city?
 
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Posted by on April 22, 2012 in culture, theology

 

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‘Ship Christians Only Can Say? Part II (Yoda and Bill Clinton make an appearance)

What gets us into trouble is not what we don’t know. 

It’s what we know for sure that just ain’t so. 

– Mark Twain

(disclaimer – in all of the scenarios and examples I create and illustrate in this post, please know they do not represent my own views or the views of anybody else in particular. They are merely examples that have been plucked out from scenarios I have seen from people throughout all of my history with the church.)

Ok, where were we? We were talking about the bifurcation (or fragmentation) that we do in our lives (i.e. sacred vs secular, private vs public, etc) to help us avoid the fear of the other or the unknown. I don’t want to focus on the fear of the unknown too much; it definitely fuels the bifurcation, but it’s not the sole reason behind why we bifurcate. But I do think the fear of the unknown is still worth exploring a little bit.

Continuing on.

Fear of the unknown 

Please hear me out on this next illustration. When some of you read the name of who proffered this analogy, which was Rob Bell, you will turn your brain off because sadly many people have ignorantly thrown the baby out with the bathwater (post coming on that topic soon) in valuable take-aways because of his most recent book, “Love Wins”. But I think this is an excellent illustration of why the fear of the unknown is so powerful. Rob Bell explains it like this: imagine all your beliefs are individual bricks in a wall and this wall is your faith – the trinity is a brick, the virgin birth is a brick, abortion is a brick, alcohol is evil, Jesus was a republican is a brick, homosexuality is a sin is a brick, strict creationism is a brick, the earth was created in 6 literal 24 hour days is a brick, the Bible being read literally is a brick, Jonah being swallowed by a fish is a brick, Jesus’s miracles are all bricks, the rapture is a brick, etc, etc.

Imagine that below is that brick wall I was talking about. The bricks are a rusty red and they are all stacked on top of each other.

the trinity the virgin birth abortion
jesus was a republican homosexuality is a sin young earth
the world and culture is evil alcohol is evil literal translation of the bible
the rapture hell is real & eternal torment jesus is the only way
the bible is inerrant god will destroy the earth evolution is wrong
God is a man original sin the resurrection
us vs them obama is the antichrist don’t question the church

You take all of these bricks, stack them on top of each other and build a strong, sturdy wall. But each of these bricks are interdependent of one another. What happens if you start to discuss one of your core truths which in effect is wiggling a brick? Or what if one of your truths is disproven somehow and you have to completely remove a brick? The structural integrity of the wall will be compromised and it is very possible it will crumble. If you build and construct your faith this way your faith might start to crumble. What’s on the other side of a deconstructed belief-system? The unknown. Can I trust God? Can I even still believe in God? Can I survive without a religion?

What’s next?

 
I am not God and I can not create him in my image

Hope is next. If we acknowledge we are not God.

For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, declares the Lord. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts.

Isaiah 55: 8, 9

It will mean that my understanding of the truth must be constantly open to revision and correction, but – and this is the crucial point – only and always within the irreversible commitment to Jesus Christ. – Lesslie Newbigin

Hold to Christ, and for the rest be totally uncommitted. – Herbert Butterfield 

Let us test and examine our ways, and return to the Lord! – Lamentations 3: 40

We have to be careful about what we do with our assumptions about God that we are constructing as core immovable truths. So the fear in this instance is the effect that if one truth is disproven your faith will crumble and fall apart, and you don’t know what will happen if your belief-system falls apart or what needs to be done to rebuild it. Maybe we put too much faith in our beliefs and derivations about God, and not enough faith in allowing God to be bigger than what we think we know.

If you know what God knows, or have God all figured out your God is not big enough.

Sacred vs Secular and Filling the Void

So, how does all of this tie back into my original problem with what the pastor said? The problem is that he is teaching from the pulpit that it is ok to view things as sacred and secular which is what propagates the us vs them mentality and puts Christians at odds against the culture. If two issues, which seem in conflict, actually meet we won’t know how we’ll deal with it or if we’ll be able to process it. We don’t know what’s on the other side of our rationally-based faith. We have this basic need where things have to make sense to us. So in order to do this we compartmentalize the conflicting things – we keep them in their place. We conjure up belief (read: coping) mechanisms to make it seem to ourself that our made-up belief is in fact believable and copacetic.

It’s easy to convince us to believe because we want certainty.

We have a deep-seated longing to confirm our desire

for an ordered universe: a universe that makes sense,

a universe in which we are special, valued, and eternal.

And on top of it all, like the child who rationalizes her behavior,

we have a deep desire to convince ourselves

that we believe for reasons other than mere psychological need.

Hence we will often seek out evidence 

to support the already existing belief

and then pretend that our belief 

arose from the evidence.” 

– Peter Rollins

Sometimes we become conflicted with our own rationale; we feel that we have to recognize science because it truly helps society move forward…but we are not going to recognize all of it, or at least not the evolution part of it – that conflicts with my faith. We have to have a government because otherwise we’ll have anarchy, but we can’t let our faith or morals play into making laws because we don’t want to impinge un-commonly held beliefs if your party is not in power. And damnit, Petrino is a coach, not a pope, he’s not a role model, it doesn’t matter if he’s a man of integrity – just let him coach.

What’s on the other side?

Is holding a fragmented worldview the right thing to do in every circumstance? I would say definitely not in regards to what the pastor said regarding “fellowship” being solely a Christian word. The tendency to fragment or compartmentalize different things in our lives so they don’t cross over to certain other areas will cause confusion when there are true signs of God interwoven in our culture. How can we recognize truth found in our culture, if we can’t discern what truth actually is and compute that the two can peaceably coexist within each other?

There is more than just the bifurcation of words that Christians can only say vs words the world can say that cuts to the root of the problem. I think alot of times when we fragment things we tend to place a sense of value on these things and when value is involved then hierarchy and exclusiveness can occur. When hierarchy and exclusiveness occur then we place a high value on what we know, and that I know I’m right, and if you’re different then you’re wrong. Fear of the unknown can cause inert distrust and a sense of self-righteousness.

“To lose that which grounds us and provides us with meaning

 involves nothing less than losing the God of religion

 in whatever form it manifests itself in our life.” 

– Peter Rollins

What’s next?

What can be on the other side? For me, I found freedom. Freedom from the notion that my beliefs had to be bundled up and make sense with a pretty bow on top. With things that might not sit well with me I can hear the cognitive dissonance and on top of that hear the beautifully layered harmony.

note – language in the video

In my next post I’ll be continuing this series and touch on the reason behind why we have this fragmented worldview and how we can reshape our lenses.

 
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Posted by on April 16, 2012 in culture, theology

 

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’Ship Christians Only Can Say?: How Bobby Petrino, Yoda, and Bill Clinton Tie-in Together

They (questions) offer us a unique opportunity

to rethink what it means to be the Church,

not merely critiquing the presently existing church 

for failing to live up to its ideals,

but rather for espousing the wrong ideals. 

– Peter Rollins

Several weeks ago I was sitting in church, probably just surfing on my phone, and the pastor made a comment that made my head snap up like a yo-yo being yanked upward. I was fully focused on listening to how he was going to explain what he had just said.

Before I jump in, please trust me, I am writing this not to solely criticize his statement/attitude; but I do believe what he said is bad theology and also a prevailing thought shared by many in the Church (the church-at-large); if not always explicit in word (although in this instance it was) it is most certainly implicit in actions. Overall, I want to try to make our church culture in Arkansas (and elsewhere) better.

Here’s the story:

The pastor was telling a story about how one afternoon he was just cruising around on the internet and saw an advertisement of a gathering for single adults that said, “Come and have some fellowship with us.”

{This next paragraph was his explanation of his gripe with that particular internet ad. When I started to write this post I listened to the podcast of the sermon when it was posted online to accurately quote what he said.}

“Man, don’t use our word! That’s not “fellowship”! “Fellowship” is not any casual human interaction that we have. “Fellowship” is not two christian guys getting together talking about how great the razorback basketball game was or how all their hunting exploits have been, that’s not “fellowship”. “Fellowship” is a lot deeper than that. “Fellowship” is not two people just getting together and working on something. It’s not you calling a friend and saying “hey, why don’t you come over and let’s do scrapbooks together and have fellowship. Well, maybe you will maybe you won’t. You say, “{Pastor} (name withheld), why are you talking about this?” Because there is incredible joy, listen friends, in genuine “fellowship”. Genuine “fellowship”. And “fellowship” is not some kind of mere friendship, “fellowship” is much deeper than that. It’s not a group of Christians getting together and having a potluck together. It’s so much bigger and deeper and wider than that.”

He went on to explain, in his opinion, what Paul teaches is required to have “genuine Fellowship”.

Deep breath…ok, I’m better. Let’s dive in.

So what’s the big deal? Why am I getting so picky about a word? First of all, even though “fellowship” isn’t used in our everyday vocabulary, I completely disagree with his definition of the word “fellowship”. I believe every situation he listed can be an excellent example of fellowship and yes, even worship, but overall that’s not what this post is about. It’s not the specific word that was used that is the problem. The false-ownership of a word is a problem, but the main issue is the problem behind the problem that I want to focus on. Some people in the Church (again, the Church-at-large) try to separate themselves from the culture in many different areas of life because they believe culture is bad and out to get to them. They isolate themselves and deem there are Christian words, watch only Christian movies, read only Christian books, and condone or criticize things under the banner of “God”, “Jesus”, or “the gospel”, when I wonder if God would want his name attached to some of those things. Yes, I’ll go as far to say this isolation and bifurcation is bad theology. I believe it portrays and creates a fragmented worldview and also creates an “us vs them” mentality. God called us to redeem (reclaim) his creation – this includes culture, but if Christians are separating themselves from culture and simply saying, “Come quickly Lord Jesus”…well, that’s the problem. So how does this “us vs them” mentality form?

Even in society as a whole (Christians and Non-Christians) we tend to hold a fragmented view of certain ideological issues in our lives: sacred vs secular; public lives vs private lives; and church vs state are just a few examples. Some Christians interpret the Bible as proffering this separation (which is borderline Gnosticism), they believe this bifurcation of sacred things and secular things (I don’t like the word “secular”) as acceptable to God. In this post and the next I’m going to hash out and explain a little more why this is not what God desires as our worldview.

{Yes, you can probably think of examples where the fragmentation isn’t a bad thing.  A boys bathroom and a girls bathroom – yes, that’s a good thing. But when the fragmentation does occur in the wrong instances it often leads to an undesired end.}

A bifurcated worldview tries to eradicate the fear of the unknown. And the fear of the unknown can cause us to do some childish things.

Here are two quick examples of a bifurcated worldview and also the fear of the unknown –

(quick note – part of this was written before the firing of Bobby Petrino and I am very impressed with the integral approach Jeff Long took in this situation.)

1) Bobby Petrino. Now, try to take off the razorback-red colored blinders for a second…  I can’t tell you how many times during this whole shameful incident I heard or read somebody say something along the lines of, “He’s our coach, he’s not the pope.”, and “We don’t care what he does on his own time, we just want him to win ball games.” That’s a clear bifurcation of his public life (his job) and his private life (his affair). And below even the waterline of people bifurcating his job from his actions, people have also bifurcated their treatment of a winning coach vs a losing coach. What I mean is, would Arkansans still be holding rallies and fighting for his job if he had an average record as a coach then had the affair, paid the woman and lied to his boss about the accident? Doubtful. Should we just care about wins and losses and not the way he carries himself in the community? Or should we value what the coach does wholly? So why all the angst from Razorback fans? Because Bobby Petrino is a damn good coach – he had won 21 games in the past 2 years and had them in the hunt for an SEC title this year which automatically put them in the hunt for the national title. Well the angst might be from what my favorite KC sports radio host likes to ask, “If not him then who?” Now that Petrino has been fired, what’s on the other side? A possible fear of the unknown. Arkansans don’t know for sure what’s on the other side since there is a coaching search just now starting, but Jeff Long did a damn good job in showing that overall integrity matters and he will attempt to make the appropriate hire. Fear of the unknown: greatly diminished.

2) Now, an example for my Jayhawk brethren on the fear of the unknown. We don’t have to think back too long ago to have a similar example. Roy Williams was our coach from 1989-2003. While on the job for 15 years at KU, Roy racked up – 4 final fours, 2 championship game appearances, several Big8/Big 12 titles, and won 81% of his games – a staggering clip. In 2000, the University of North Carolina’s coach Bill Guthridge retired and UNC (chiefly, Dean Smith) tried to coerce Roy to “come home to North Carolina” to be their coach. Roy graduated from North Carolina and was an assistant to Dean Smith their hall of fame coach. After deliberation Roy declined by saying, “I’m staying.”

Later on in the same press conference Roy also said, “The next time I have a press conference is when I’m fired, or I retire.”

What does that say to you? To KU fans it meant he was never leaving, that he would retire at KU. In 2003, UNC fired Matt Doherty, and came after Roy…again. What?! He already told us he’d never leave. Well, he left and we all felt betrayed. Now, we weren’t worried about attracting a top flight coach – we are one of the top 4/5 programs of all-time in college basketball – James Naismith (inventor of the game coached at KU), Phog Allen (grandfather of coaching, coached at KU and has our Fieldhouse named after him), Adolph Rupp (from KU, played under Allen, and coached at UK), Dean Smith (from KU, played under Allen, coach at University of North Carolina), Larry Brown, Wilt Chamberlain (player), JoJo White, Paul Pierce, (and many more of course) #2 school in all-time victories, 14 final fours, 5 national titles, countless all-americans etc, etc…but still there was the fear of the unknown. Who would we have as our coach, and would he do as good as Roy? If not Roy, then who? That thought was running wild through our minds when Roy left. Yes, I was bitter at Roy. He told us he’d never leave. I took my “Benedict Williams” t-shirt to the 2005 Final Four and was crushed to watch him when his first national championship. Enter Bill Self to replace Roy. Now, if you would have told us when Roy left that Bill would win 8 straight Big 12 titles, make it to 2 Final Fours in his first 9 years, have several all-americans, win at a better percentage than Roy (Self’s win % is 85% – ridiculous!), and that Bill would beat North Carolina the two times he’s faced them to this point, then the fear of the unknown would’ve been eased quite a bit. But absolutely 100% of the bitterness was erased in 2008 when Bill got to his first Final Four and beat UNC in the national semifinals, and also won the national championship in his 5th year as our coach that year. Fear of the unknown with Bill: 100% gone.

So what do I mean by the fear of the unknown? When we have fear of new ground that we’re approaching maybe it’s not the specific thing standing in front of us that is feared, but it’s actually the effect, or fallout, of what might happen that is feared…or maybe it’s a bit of both.

I’m not afraid of falling…it’s the landing that worries me.  

Make sense? If not, sit back and think about it for a second…look at the things you might bifurcate. I’ll try to pull it all in tomorrow with the second part (of 3 or maybe 4 parts) of this post. And remember this is all tying back to a bifurcated (fragmented) worldview that some Christians carry of “us vs them”. Tomorrow we’ll also hear from Yoda and Bill Clinton.

“Man, don’t use our word.” Man, I hope I never hear that again.

 

 
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Posted by on April 12, 2012 in culture, theology

 

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Robin Hood’s Tax

Friday night at the private opening of Maduro Cigar Lounge (http://www.facebook.com/MaduroLounge)  I had a very enjoyable talk with two well-respected and well-known gentlemen of Arkansas – they were also father and son. One of the topics we talked about was the lottery in AR. During the conversation the phrase of it being a “tax on the poor” was used.  This blog-post isn’t about my feelings on the lottery – I’m absolutely ok with it; but instead this post is how I have a bit of a problem with the phrase “the lottery is a tax on the poor”.

Again, you can agree or disagree with what I am about to say – obviously everybody is entitled to their opinion…but I hope that we can be people who at the very least can understand each other’s perspective. Understanding ≠ agreement.

Now, my friend used the phrase, “tax on the poor”, but by no means is it only him who uses this phrase, I have heard it used countless times. When people choose to use the phrase, “tax on the poor” they are trying to convey the point that the lottery preys on the poor and gets them to buy the lottery tickets when they have a hard enough time just rubbing two nickels together.  I can understand completely what they mean when they say this, but I think it’s a stretch to phrase it like this. Actually, check that, I think it’s a complete bastardization of the word “tax” and manipulation of words chosen solely to prey on our heart-strings.

Tax in its rudimentary form has been around for centuries – probably since the beginning of time when people were exchanging something of value for something else. I’m not an expert on taxes – in fact I hate taxes. I’ve been working on my taxes this weekend and I want less taxes. A friend of mine said that if we want tax reform we would have everybody write a check each month for their taxes instead of having them automatically deducted out of their paycheck – it’s a big eye opener when you pay your tax that way…and that’s a rabbit-trail I might chase in another post but for now it’s not the main point.

The word tax, obviously has a couple definitions. One definition refers to if something is taxing then that means it’s burdensome or tiresome. The other definition is the more common understanding – a tax is a monetary payment levied by a government on its people or businesses. Taxes can be collected on a number of things: income, sales, property, etc. I believe the latter definition is the or definition, or implied meaning, that is being used for this phrase.

Ok, now the main reason for this post…

The fact is, I have the ability to choose whether or not I will buy a lottery ticket – I am in no way whatsoever forced to buy a lottery ticket. And the good news is, everybody else has this same ability to choose on their own. Now…taxes are a different matter. If I choose to not pay my income tax a certain group of people in the IRS might object to my choice. What I’m trying to say is, I don’t have the ability to choose whether or not I will pay my taxes – it is automatically included in to everything you and I buy and automatically deducted out of your paycheck*. When you buy your groceries does the checker ask you, “Would you like to pay sales tax on your bread, butter, and apple juice?” No, that choice is not given – it’s automatically included in to your total.

If I choose to not pay my income tax I have the very real possibility of going to jail for being a tax evader. If I choose to not buy a lottery ticket well…there’s no penalty. And because of this I think it is woefully incorrect to call it a “tax on the poor”.

Finally, you might be thinking, this is just an issue of semantics. Well, actually, yes, it kind of is. Semantics is looking at the meaning behind words and phrases and that’s pretty much what I just did. I think we need to avoid being lazy with our words and instead be more intentional with our words, and the implied messages we send. Saying it’s a “tax on the poor” might tug on the heartstrings but it is categorically incorrect. Furthermore, I think we need to be more responsible with the words we choose. Responsible = able to give a response.  Hopefully we can be more cognizant and intentional of the words and phrases we choose instead of merely just provoking a reaction.

Provoking a reaction isn’t the same thing as saying something significant.

– Calvin, from Calvin and Hobbes

* I am an independent contractor, my income tax is not automatically deducted out of my paycheck. Uncle Sam instead allows me to smile and write a check to him each quarter to cover my portion.

 
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Posted by on February 12, 2012 in culture, politics

 

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